Tuesday, February 21, 2017

February 20, 2017
Ridge Spring News
Harriet Householder

FORS will meet this Thursday at 5:00 at the Ridge Spring Library.  WE received funds for the Saluda County Council ATA funds. We are thankful for the money given to this organization to benefit Ridge Spring.  This will be one of the topics.

Next Harvest Festival Meeting - March 7th 7 pm at the library

Ridge Spring Farmers' Market News:  The 2017 Farmers' market Nutrition Program Reauthorization is in the mail.  The period has begun for this reauthorization and will end Friday March 17, 2017.  Farmers are not required to attend a formal training session until 2018 unless notified otherwise.  Mail application to Emily M. Joyce at SC Dept of Agriculture.  Information will be posted later.  This is so vouchers may be accepted by individual farmers at the market.

Rod Lewis, Senior Pastor Hollywood Baptist: The Saluda area churches will be sponsoring a Spring Event on April 15th from 10-12 noon at the park in Saluda.  We will have an Easter egg hunt, Inflatables,  and several children's activities. All events are free to the public. We will be selling BBQ for your enjoyment! 

Children's  Pottery Class at the Art Center of  Ridge Spring Tuesday, March 7 at 4:00-5:30 each Tuesday for 6 weeks with last class being Wednesday, April 12.  Cost of $80.00 includes everything to make glaze and fire several finished pieces.  Call Joanne Crouch for more information (803) 685-5577.          
Benefit for Ricky Rodgers:
On December 23rd, Ricky was diagnosed with Stage 4 Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer and is currently undergoing chemo every 2 weeks. There is going to be a benefit held on March 11, 2017 to help raise money for Ricky’s medical expenses, medicine, and household bills due to his no longer being able to work. Any help is greatly appreciated! Ricky is 46 years old, a father of 4, and a wonderful husband to his wife Tasha, who is also undergoing treatment for M.S. (multiple sclerosis).

We are selling Chipped BBQ plates including: cole slaw, baked beans, bread, and tea.
The plates are $10 each and are to be purchased in advance to allow us a head count. You will be able to pick up the plates at the Civic Center from 4-7pm. While picking up your plates you can enjoy a silent auction(4-7pm) and live entertainment starting at 6:00 pm. The Ace of Clubs featuring Joey Cromer will be performing. Jenifer has tickets with her at the bank or you can contact one of the below coordinators. We are also raffling off a Yeti Cooler. Raffle tickets are $5 each. The drawing will be held at the benefit. You do not have to be present to win.

All proceeds go to the Cancer Fund for Ricky Rodgers. An account has been opened at First Citizens Bank for anyone wanting to make a donation, or you can contact one of the below coordinators. Donations, Ticket Purchases or Questions contact:
Joe Rodgers-864-992-2257; Phyllis Shealy-803-369-4553;Joni Pope- 803-687-4006; or
Jenifer Gentry- 864-323-4140

AIKEN COUNTY, S.C. (WJBF) – Ridge Spring-Monetta Middle-High School is converting into a healthy living campus by putting a tasty spin on Agricultural Science.
RSM is the first school in the district to offer a farm-to-table class. The new program benefits everyone in the county because once the crops are ready they’ll be enjoyed by all Aiken County students.
“This is science,” said Agriculture teacher Michael Crim. “This is the original science.”
Aiken County student, William Newsome says he doesn’t mind getting his hands dirty to enjoy the fruits and vegetables of his labor.“After I get these planted we are going to put them in those pots with water so they will grow,” Newsome told WJBF News Channel 6.
Seeds of jalapenos and peppers aren’t the only things growing, in the greenhouse, at Ridge Spring-Monetta Middle-High School. The Agriculture teacher is planting a more important seed, the seed of knowledge. “They’re producing what they are going to be eating,” Crim said. “It teaches them where food comes from, it teaches them a little bit of management skills.” Crim is leading the new farm-to-table initiative in Aiken County. For a class period students go to the greenhouse to learn what it takes to run a farm.
“You have to make sure you don’t flood the plants. You have to make sure they have enough water. You have to keep an eye on them. Different plants need different sun level and if you give them too much sun they either burn and if you don’t give them enough they won’t grow.” Newsome said.
Repeat:
At the Friends of Ridge Spring meeting, Vickie Baker shared information from the Saluda County Chamber of Commerce meeting. Vickie is going to be the representative from Ward and Kristi Harris will be the representative for Ridge Spring. Sherry Ward (Pres.) and Tom Brooks (VP) were in attendance to discuss ways the Chamber could help Ridge Spring with their events and possible create new ones. They shared about the events they have had in Saluda and the things they have learned. Discussion ensued about the possibility of a movie night in Ridge Spring at the new Town Hall. Information was given as to how to get the land cleaned up and ready, how to run electricity, and other logistics. It was decided that it would be held May or June. it will cost approximately $600 to hold a movie night.
RIDGE SPRING UNITED METHODIST CHURCH: So maybe your pick to win the Super Bowl didn’t, you can still be a winner by donating soup to the RSUMC Souper Bowl Shoot Out! Place your donated soup on the porch of the Family Center in front of the Team of your choice. Currently Atlanta is ahead 20 cans to 12…A church member will make sure your donated soup is placed in the Big Red Box. Come on, community, there is plenty of time left in February to make your Team a winner AND help those who might not have enough to eat a little more comfortable. RSUMC Services are held at 11:00 AM every Sunday unless otherwise noted.



Josie Rodgers:
Aiken County Public Schools’ Area Four Town Hall Meeting will take place Tues., Feb. 21, at 6:30 pm at Calendonia Baptist Church at 1887 Old 96 Indian Trail in Batesburg.  Superintendent Dr. Alford will also provide updates on the progress of the district as well as future plans. 
RSM Elem:  Congratulations to Teacher of the Year Betsie Davenport!  The First Year Teacher of the Year is Kristin Boney and the GEM is Ms. Driggers! 
Aiken County Public Schools and Aiken County First Steps are offering free monthly parenting classes at RSM Elem. Contact the school for more info.
RSM Middle: Several students participated in the MathCounts competition on Sat., Feb. 11 at Aiken Technical College.  After only a few weeks of practice, they finished in the top 10! Now that they have the experience under their belts, we expect them to do amazing things for competition next year!  Great job Franklin Starkey, Nehemiah Blacks, Chaley Robb, Camren Samuels, Trinity LaBrew, and Larry Price.
RSM High:  Congratulations to sophomore Crystal Preston who was named Co-Player of the Year by the South Carolina Basketball Coaches Association. She has also recently scored her 1,000th career point!  Senior Tyson Bettis made the All-State Basketball Team. Coach Mark Wright for being chosen to coach in the North South All-Star basketball game this year!
Congratulations to Teacher of the Year Mrs. Tiffany Middlebrooks, First Year Teacher of the Year Kimberly Patterson, and GEM Mrs. Ella Wigfall. 
The Black History program was last Friday.  It was full of amazing performances. Many of our own students participated and performed.  We enjoyed the Gospel Warriors mimes, Sistaz 4 Christ, Karisma, Wayne Jay, Gary Smith, The Voice, Rashod Roland, and more.  The special guest speaker Maggie Wallace Glover, senator from Florence County.  Many thanks to Mrs. Monica Jones and all of her helpers. 

Review from David Marshall James:  "The Nowhere Man" by Gregg Hurwitz
   Gregg Hurwitz's follow-up to his 2016 novel, "Orphan X," sizzles with top-shelf thrills, his stylistics as slick as an iced-over freeway on-ramp.
   With masterful control, he depicts protagonist Evan Smoak, a former black-ops U.S. government operative who has ditched the feds to become an underground righter of the seriously wronged.
   However, the tables turn on Evan during one of his rescue missions, breaking up an underground ring supplying teenage girls to the highest bidders.
   Tasered and shock-collared, he winds up a prisoner in a madman's mansion, secluded in a bleak valley in who-knows-where.  He's a real Nowhere Man, sitting in this Nowhere Land.
   Of course, Evan's hardly sitting.  He's highly proactive, enlisting every opportunity to get a grip on his surroundings and to plot an escape.  Trouble is, he's surrounded by heavily armed guards and Dobermans.
   Plus, said madman, who plans to force Evan to wire over millions from a secret bank account, is up to some seriously freaky activities that would make Dr. Frankenstein tap through several choruses of "Puttin' on the Ritz."
   Nevertheless, everything remains frighteningly real at the fingertips of the author, who steadily ratchets up the excitement, presenting some grandiose "wow" moments. It's as if there are three conclusions to this super-sized story.
   Meanwhile, Evan looks down the barrel of his life from the other end-- has he made the right choice as a self-appointed superhero, leaping into the fray du jour in his gray Ts?  Why doesn't he just play it low to some isolated isle, sipping ultra purified vodka martinis (his beverage of choice) and blending with the natives, like a refugee from the HMS Bounty?
   Lay down his sword and shield, as it were, after all those years of black-opping?
   The author exhibits a fine hand with his flavorful dialogue and juicy syntax in a red-hot read that fairly renders the pages combustible.  In all, it's Smoak-in'.

On a personal note: this is the first year since I have opened 14 years ago that I did not participate in selling roses at Valentines.  I remained closed.  WOW!!!  How fortunate I was to have made that decision - I got the flu and it knocked me down for almost two weeks.  I would not have had any way to fulfill any orders.  You can call it silver linings or mysterious ways but I sure was thankful.  Now to start my seeds for spring.  The bulbs and flowering trees are just beautiful.  The Peach trees are blooming early but they are still magnificent.  How fortunate we are!!!

REMINDERS
Ridge Spring Library hours: Mon/Tues 8:30 am - 12 pm; Wed., 8:30 – 4:30; Thurs 8:30 am - 12:30 pm; Fri 8:30 pm -4:30 pm
Ridge Spring Post Office hours:  Mon-Fri. 7:30 am – 11:30 am; Sat 9 – 10 am
Saluda County Library Hours:  Mon/Wed 8:30 am-5 pm; Tues/Thurs 8:30 am – 6 pm; Fri 8:30 am – 5 pm; Sat closed
Recycling Center Hours: Mon/Wed/Fri 1-7; Sat 7-7; Sun 3-7; Tues/Thurs closed
First Thursday of the Month:  AARS meets at 6:30, 685-5783
Third Thursday of the Month: FORS at Library at 5:00


Thursday, February 16, 2017

February 13, 2017
Ridge Spring News
Harriet Householder
At the Friends of Ridge Spring meeting, Vickie Baker shared information from the Saluda County Chamber of Commerce meeting. Vickie is going to be the representative from Ward and Kristi Harris will be the representative for Ridge Spring. Sherry Ward (Pres.) and Tom Brooks (VP) were in attendance to discuss ways the Chamber could help Ridge Spring with their events and possible create new ones. They shared about the events they have had in Saluda and the things they have learned. Discussion ensued about the possibility of a movie night in Ridge Spring at the new Town Hall. Information was given as to how to get the land cleaned up and ready, how to run electricity, and other logistics. It was decided that it would be held May or June. it will cost approximately $600 to hold a movie night.
The Harvest Festival Meeting scheduled for this past week had to be cancelled due to illness.  It will be rescheduled as soon as possible.
Sunday, February 19th the Jerusalem Youth Department will sponsor a "Souperbowl."  Members are asked to prepare their favorite soup, and the members will determine which soup is their favorite. 
RIDGE SPRING UNITED METHODIST CHURCH: So maybe your pick to win the Super Bowl didn’t, you can still be a winner by donating soup to the RSUMC Souper Bowl Shoot Out! Place your donated soup on the porch of the Family Center in front of the Team of your choice. Currently Atlanta is ahead 20 cans to 12…A church member will make sure your donated soup is placed in the Big Red Box. Come on, community, there is plenty of time left in February to make your Team a winner AND help those who might not have enough to eat a little more comfortable. RSUMC Services are held at 11:00 AM every Sunday unless otherwise noted.

Ridge Spring Farmers' Market News:  The 2017 Farmers' market Nutrition Program Reauthorization is in the mail.  The period has begun for this reauthorization and will end Friday March 17, 2017.  Farmers are not required to attend a formal training session until 2018 unless notified otherwise.  Mail application to Emily M. Joyce at SC Dept of Agriculture.  Information will be posted later.  This is so vouchers may be accepted by individual farmers at the market.

Release: Parade Entries, Entertainers Wanted for the Johnston Peach Blossom Festival: web posted February 6, 2017
JOHNSTON –  The Johnston, S.C., Peach Blossom Festival wants you! 
Entertainment Entertainment has been a big part of the 34 years of the Festival, and now is your chance to be a part of the historic Festival. The Festival wants to feature talented people, local and not-so local, as part of the day-long entertainment in the 34th annual event, held in downtown Johnston on May 6, 2017. Entertainers who think they have what it takes to be a part of this year’s Festival should contact Tonya King, (803) 480-0427,tking@trantechradiators.com. Parade: The Festival is now taking applications for individuals, organizations and businesses interested in being a part of the Festival’s parade. Those interested in participating in the parade should contact Parade Chairman Roger Lamb, (803) 480-2690, 505 Roland Ave., Johnston, SC 29832, betty19331941@att.net. Applications and expressions of interest are also now being accepted in the following areas: Food Concessions: Noah Peterson, (803) 480-0135, P.O. Box 282, Johnston, SC 29832, amossonsfh@yahoo.com. Arts and Crafts: Arts and Crafts: Donna Livingston, (803) 275-7002, P.O. Box 311, Johnston, SC 29832, info@edgefieldcountychamber.org; Pageant: The pageant will be held April 15, 10 a.m. Applications can be obtained from Gina Logue, 1129 Hwy. 378 East, Edgefield SC, 29824, 637-5383; or for more information contact Janice Cleveland, (803) 334-2507, Jcleveland@edgefield.k12.sc.us; and Rides: Debra Aston, (803) 275-2345, 416 Lee St., Suite 2, Johnston, SC 29832, astond@bellsouth.net. Program Book Ads: Debra Aston, (803) 275-2345, 416 Lee St., Suite 2, Johnston, SC  29832, astond@bellsouth.net. The Johnston Development Corporation, a non-profit volunteer organization, sponsors the Festival.  The Corporation works to aid the community in areas such as economic development, education, recreation, historic preservation, tourism, scientific and cultural opportunities, and continued promotion of Johnston.  To learn more about the Festival or the Johnston Development Corporation, visit the website at http://www.johnstondevelopmentcorp.org/.

REMINDERS
Ridge Spring Library hours: Mon/Tues 8:30 am - 12 pm; Wed., 8:30 – 4:30; Thurs 8:30 am - 12:30 pm; Fri 8:30 pm -4:30 pm
Ridge Spring Post Office hours:  Mon-Fri. 7:30 am – 11:30 am; Sat 9 – 10 am
Saluda County Library Hours:  Mon/Wed 8:30 am-5 pm; Tues/Thurs 8:30 am – 6 pm; Fri 8:30 am – 5 pm; Sat closed
Recycling Center Hours: Mon/Wed/Fri 1-7; Sat 7-7; Sun 3-7; Tues/Thurs closed
First Thursday of the Month:  AARS meets at 6:30, 685-5783

Third Thursday of the Month: FORS at Library at 5:00

Monday, February 6, 2017

February 6, 2017
Harvest Festival has been cancelled due to illness
 February 6, 2017
Ridge Spring News
Harriet Householder

The next Harvest Festival meeting will be this Tuesday,  Feb 7th at 7:00 pm at the library.  Please attend the meeting and lend us a hand in planning for next year! 

Last month there was a Friends of Ridge Spring meeting at the RS Library.  What projects we are planning includes an updated Ridge Spring brochure that will be placed in the businesses of Ridge Spring and in the Welcome Centers of South Carolina and the Aiken Welcome Center. After the meeting Joe Cal Watson, Samantha McClure and I went to Juniper to dine.  We were discussing our school years when Joe told us of the following incident.  Winnefred Forrest (Rutland) had a first cousin visiting Elizabeth Edwards who found an arrowhead .  She told Joe and George Newton Dorsett that they could fight over the arrowhead and whoever won got the arrowhead.  Joe got the arrowhead, but he is not sure where it is now.  Then the conversation continued to high school and then turning 21 years old.  We talked about voting and possibly buying a drink.  Then Joe told us about when he was 21 he was totally responsible for 3 officers, 80 enlisted men , 7 jeeps and 6 mortars.  This was during World War II.  The US Army issued a bottle of gin, 1/2 bottle of scotch and a carton of cigarettes to each officer.
Yon Family Farm is holding their sale on February 18th There will be around 200 bulls and 75 females up for auction.  People will be coming from around the southeast for a wonderful opportunity.  Yon Family Farms is a family-owned operation whose primary purpose is to raise high-quality Angus, SimAngus, and Ultrablack cattle. The Yon family consists of Kevin and Lydia and their three children: Sally, Drake, and Corbin. Kevin is a first generation Angus breeder who got his introduction into the cattle business at the age of twelve. It was then that he borrowed money to purchase an Angus heifer. Kevin met his wife, Lydia, at Clemson University where they were both pursuing degrees in Animal Science. After college, they got their feet wet as a couple in the cattle industry by landing their dream job of managing a registered Angus operation, Congaree Farms, near Columbia, SC. After seven and a half years of growth there, the owner decided to disperse his cattle operation. Out of a job, but not their dream, the Yons took the plunge in 1996 and started their own Angus operation, Yon Family Farms in Ridge Spring, SC. What began on 100 acres with additional leased land has evolved into an operation utilizing over 2000 acres, which maintains approximately 800 head of registered brood cows and 200 commercial cows. The Yons will host both a Spring and Fall Production Sale where they sell around 400 registered bulls and 200 females each year. The Yons stress the importance of utilizing all the tools available. They develop three groups of sale bulls each year. Their operation is forage based and focuses on producing cattle for their customer base which is made up mainly of progressive commercial cattlemen.
Kenny Leapart has changed his hours at the Car Wash  He will now be open after 2:00 during the week  and regular hours on the weekend.  You can call for an appointment, too.    
The Gables Inn and Gardens enjoyed a great time scrapbooking the end of January. A fun weekend of laughing, crying, eating, drinking, reconnecting with old friends, making new ones and scrapbooking of course!! Watch for our next one to be scheduled. Call now and schedule your Valentine getaway during February. Stay a single night or for the whole weekend.  803-685-0099 

Off the Beaten Path celebrates 3 brand new vendors. D'Litefulls has beautifully crocheted shawls, ponchos, jewelry, and scarves. She also has painted glass globes and bottles with fairy lights. Rough Around the Edges has created some beautiful repurposed furniture. You have to see the incredible clock in the store window. We also have an artist moving in that hand paints wooden signs for our homes. Let us help you shop for the Valentine's in your life..

Recovery Works, a faith based residential recovery center for men, has closed its operations in Ridge Spring after 9 prosperous years. The Recovery center helped men locally and all across the USA for 9 years. Recovery works helped over 560 men to recover from the abyss of addiction/ alcoholism. We were happy to support the town of Ridge Spring in many ways. We supported the Harvest Festival, Local Police Department, Fire department and fund raising for many local events. We did this work without accepting any local , city , county, state or Federal Grant money. Please accept our many thanks to the people of Ridge Spring and surrounding areas for their support. It was a great pleasure to be of service to God and our fellow man . God bless America. Sincerely Flint R Thomas, Founder / Director. 
Ten members of the Ridge Spring-Monetta High School Band attended the Limestone College Band Clinic in Gaffney, SC  Thursday, January 26 through Saturday, January 28.  The students auditioned and rehearsed on Thursday evening, rehearsed all day Friday and attended a concert by the Limestone College Tuba/Euphonium Ensemble, and rehearsed and gave a concert on Saturday.  It was a great opportunity for the students as they performed higher level music in the 115-member Honor Band.  There was also time for other activities such as bowling, laser tag, and video games.  Members from the RS-M Band to attend were:  Joanna Kaiser (Flute), McKenzie Minor and Cameron Davis (Alto Sax), Tyler Rowe, Jonathan Cumbee, and Kandon Hastings (Trumpet), Jonathan Middlebrooks (Trombone), and Katara Coleman, D.J. Padgett, and Alex Timmerman (Euphonium).  Special congratulations to Jonathan Middlebrooks for earning first chair in the trombone section!
RSM Elem (Rene Miller): 
From Nurse Bearden: Nobody likes being sick.  Here are some tips to help you stay healthy and keep the flu away.  Wash your hands, eat plenty of fruit and vegetables, drink lots of water, get plenty of exercise, keep your hands away from your mouth, nose, and eyes, get 9 hours of sleep each night, dress warmly, and GET VACCINATED!!!
Josie Rodgers
Aiken County Public Schools will hold Town Hall meetings to hear the needs of the public concerning our schools.  Superintendent Dr. Alford will also provide updates on the progress of the district as well as future plans.  Area Four’s meeting will take place Tues., Feb. 21, at 6:30 pm at Caledonia Baptist Church at 1887 Old 96 Indian Trail in Batesburg. 
It’s National School Counseling Week!  This year’s theme is "School Counseling: Helping Students Realize Their Potential."  Counselors in all schools do so much for our young people besides talk to them!  These professionals are a major asset to our young people, helping them be successful in school and plan their futures.  Thank a counselor today! 
Cinderella Project (The Aiken Boutique) On Sat., Feb. 18, from 9 am to noon, high school young ladies can go to The Aiken Boutique at Maxwell Law Firm at 225 Chesterfield St. NW.  They will have new and used dresses, accessories and more! All items are available at no charge to high school students. To enter, you must bring your student ID. Limit one dress per student. Questions? Please contact Ashley Hammack at 803/642-1557, ext 108.
RSM Middle: The Science Fair will be held Feb. 16.  All students will complete a science project.  We are excited to see what amazing projects our students create!
The Black History program will be held Fri., Feb. 17, in the gym.  Based on last year’s program, you don’t want to miss this!
Every Friday during the month of February, middle and high school students will have an opportunity to win a $5 McDonald's gift card and other prizes by answering Black History trivia questions. 
RSMMH is conducting a Black History writing contest in honor of Black History Month.  The essays will be judged, and the top three essays will be selected as winners in both the middle and high school for a total of 6 students. The winners will be announced at the Black History program on Feb. 17. Most importantly, the winners will be given a certificate and also be treated to an all-you-can-eat-lunch at Shealy's BBQ.
Did you know that RSM High offers Saturday school to its students?  Those in danger of failing, particularly due to absences, are encouraged to sign up and show up!  For more info, contact the school.

Review by David Marshall James: "Audrey:  The 50s" by David Wills
   "Sabrina" (1954), in which the titular chauffeur's daughter returns to the Hamptons from her Paris studies "a la glam magnifique", became the makeover dream of millions of American women.
   With a new coiffure, a trunk full of made-to-fit Givenchy gowns, and some of that fabled French je ne sais quoi, and you were all set to wed one of your daddy's megamillionaire employers.
   Thus, Audrey Hepburn did more for the junior year abroad than countless college-catalog come-on's for croissant-crunching credit hours.
   Although of Belgian birth-- with English schooling-- she never seemed like a foreign movie star, but more like an American actress with a whole lot of class.
   She certainly didn't possess Greta Garbo's symmetrically fine features, nor Hedy Lamarr's otherworldly gorgeous visage.  Rather, Audrey gave the ordinary woman hope that, with the correct beauty treatment and some tres-fab glad rags, allure was just within reach of her gloved fingers.
   As The New York Times would note:  "Half a generation of young females stopped stuffing their bras and teetering on stiletto heels."
   Always self-conscious of her feet and height, Hepburn stuck to flats, ballet slippers, and "kitten heels."  Yet, as with Garbo-- also always obsessed with her plus-size tootsies-- no one was really focusing there.
   Audrey's rise to cinema glory was routed by some of Hollywood's greatest directors-- William Wyler, Billy Wilder, King Vidor, Fred Zinnemann, and (Columbia’s own) Stanley Donen-- and accompanied by such Hollywood legends as Gregory Peck, Humphrey Bogart, Gary Cooper, Henry Fonda, and one of the great loves of her life, William Holden, although they never married.
   This volume includes a photo of Holden leaning against the hood of his to-die-for Nash-Healey convertible on a Manhattan curbside, during the filming of "Sabrina." Let's review:  Hepburn and Holden in a Nash-Healey.  That pretty well defines Hollywood cool.
   America owned a real sense of glamour during the 1950s, and Audrey was at its forefront, like some chromium hood-ornament goddess.  That feeling is captured in page upon page of this lovingly produced volume.  Indeed, many of the pictorial delights hail from the personal collection of cinema chronicler David Wills, whose previous works include "Hollywood in Kodachrome" as well as "Audrey:  The 60s."
   Wills presents a Hollywood and fashion icon during the first decade of her film career, an actress who would come to learn what all her achievements meant in the long run:  "People associate me with a time when movies were pleasant, when women wore pretty dresses in films and you heard beautiful music.  I always love it when people write to me and say, 'I was having a rotten time, and I walked into a cinema and saw one of your movies, and it made such a difference.' "

REMINDERS
Ridge Spring Library hours: Mon/Tues 8:30 am - 12 pm; Wed., 8:30 – 4:30; Thurs 8:30 am - 12:30 pm; Fri 8:30 pm -4:30 pm
Ridge Spring Post Office hours:  Mon-Fri. 7:30 am – 11:30 am; Sat 9 – 10 am
Saluda County Library Hours:  Mon/Wed 8:30 am-5 pm; Tues/Thurs 8:30 am – 6 pm; Fri 8:30 am – 5 pm; Sat closed
Recycling Center Hours: Mon/Wed/Fri 1-7; Sat 7-7; Sun 3-7; Tues/Thurs closed
First Thursday of the Month:  AARS meets at 6:30, 685-5783

Third Thursday of the Month: FORS at Library at 5:00

Monday, January 30, 2017

January 30, 2017
Ridge Spring News
Harriet Householder

All of us had a wonderful time seeing Joe Cal Watson at the Nut House and enjoying his retirement drop in.  The Yons were gracious hosts for the event and the pecan pie was the best.

Hughes Aerial Imagery LLC can trace its beginning to a battery operated tiny remote-controlled helicopter. Given one Christmas to Tom Hughes, he flew the helicopter until the battery could no longer be charged. Even though this little helicopter basically only went up and down, he was intrigued and began researching remote control helicopters. Visiting established forums and sites, Tom decided to try his hand at single rotor helicopters and purchased the Esky Honey Bee. After many, many attempts to fly Tom was about to throw in the towel when his wife, Nanette said: “I’ve never know you to give up on anything.”  So, he didn’t give up and finally learned to fly the “Bee”.  This led to bigger and more powerful helicopters and greatly improved flight skills.
After mastering the single rotors, Tom moved on to multi rotors, both flying and building and repairing, because if you fly a lot you will need to know how to repair. Tom enjoyed videoing and had a small but faithful YouTube following
Then the word drone hit social media!  Drones were everywhere and there was a certain uneasiness regarding the use and guidelines. Tom decided to let the dust settle and see what played out, especially when the FAA became involved.
After months of hearsay and speculation, specific guidelines and requirements were published outlining how, where and who could fly a drone. Tom then began to study for his drone pilot’s license, took the test and passed. He purchased a Phantom IV drone and accessory equipment and Hughes Aerial Imagery LLC became a reality.
With wife Nanette, they set up a web site, Face Book page and did some pro bono work for a local real estate company and a timber company in Georgia. Tom said: “There is no limit to what a drone can video. You are only limited by your imagination.” He hopes to find his ‘niche’ in the drone business.
The Hughes are excited to become another small business here on The Ridge and asked that you visit their web site: hughesaerialimagery.com or visit them on Face Book. Tom says,”Be careful if you receive a toy at Christmas that you can’t put down, it just might start another entirely different chapter in your life”. His sure did.
RIDGE SPRING UNITED METHODIST CHURCH: During the month of January The Big Red Box collected non perishable food and drinks for the Back Pack Ministry. These items will be used right here in our community. Thanks to everyone who participated.

Souper (Super) Bowl is coming! Whether you are a New England fan, Go Patriots, or an Atlanta fan, Go Falcons, this is your chance to show off your Team pride. How you say? By bringing soup and placing your donation in front of your Team’s sign. The soup will make its way into the Big Red Box. The signs will be on the Family Life Center Porch starting February 1st. Church members will collect, count and maintain a running total of which Team is ahead. Even after the Big Game is over, please continue to show your support throughout the month of February. The collected soup will be distributed to food banks in our area. Results of the soup, shoot out will be posted in this column. Let’s have some fun, help our neighbors. What’s better than a warm bowl of soup on a cold winter’s day? Thanks in advance. Church Services are at 11 a.m. every Sunday unless other wised noted.

 Nate Birt,Top Producer Managing Editor at AG/WEB powered By Farm Journal: First-generation farmers Chalmers and Lori Anne Carr of Titan Farms have been named the winners of the 2017 Top Producer of the Year award. The couple’s operation is one of the largest peach producers in the U.S. They also grow peppers and broccoli and recently diversified with a frozen-fruit facility for processing of peaches that are sold in bulk or pureed for use in yogurt, baby food and other products.
“My husband and I are truly living a dream,” Lori Anne Carr told attendees of Top Producer’s annual awards banquet in Chicago before the winner was announced.
“On the farm, we truly have a motto that nobody’s going to come up and pat you on the back, or nobody’s going to say, ‘Great job,’” Chalmers added. “We get our achievements and our personal goals set by going out and protecting the natural resources that we have, cultivating those into crops and producing staples and food for other people to eat. My personal joy comes from doing that day in and day out.”
Sponsored by Bayer and Case IH, the Top Producer of the Year contest is in its 18th year and represents the best in the business of farming. In addition to the Carrs, finalists for this year’s award were John Pagel of Pagel’s Ponderosa Dairy, a dairy and grain operation in Kewaunee, Wis., and brothers Richard and Roderick Gumz of Gumz Farms, a row crop and vegetable operation in Endeavor, Wis. Readers of AgWeb.com and Top Producer will learn more about each of the finalists in future news articles.
Each of the finalists received a trip for two to attend the seminar and will receive sessions with a CEO coach. The winner will receive the opportunity to be enrolled for a year in the Top Producer Executive Network™ peer group program, courtesy of Bayer. Additionally, the winner will get to choose either a Steiger Rowtrac or a Magnum Rowtrac from Case IH for 150 hours of use, courtesy of Case IH
Josie Rodgers
Aiken County Public Schools will hold Town Hall meetings to hear the needs of the public concerning our schools.  Superintendent Dr. Alford will also provide updates on the progress of the district as well as future plans.  Area Four’s meeting will take place Tues., Feb. 21, at 6:30 pm at Calendonia Baptist Church at 1887 Old 96 Indian Trail in Batesburg. 
RSM Elem (Rene Miller):  Congratulations to Alexander Fierros-Garcia who won 1stplace in the K-2 category of the district MLK Poster Contest. He won a Kindle Fire Tablet!  We are very proud of Alex for this great accomplishment.
The 4thgrade would like to thank the PTO for purchasing the pizza and drinks to celebrate our Math Masters! Multiplication Masters: Lauriana Cabana, Alissa Cato, JaQuez Gantt, Parker Holsomback, Peyton Holsomback,  Natalie Mitchum, Heather OsbunShirey, Ty'Trell Smith, Arianna Williams, Aubrianna Wise, Landon Wooten,   Multiplication and Division Masters: Logan Brightwell, Cade Cockrell, Tikara Lewis, Taylor Long, Briston Matthews, Jemmell Morris, Cassandra Oakman, Sebastian Ogden, Braylon Smith, Christian Smith, James Smith, Maryann Sterling, Elihjah Thomas, and Kaytlin Tindal
TheWalk/Jog Clubhas made 9.8 more miles.  That puts us at 247.65 miles for the year out of the 516 miles that we need to get to Washington D.C.  We are currently on I-95 in Smithfield, NC.  We need to average 18 miles per week for the rest of the year to make our goal.
Active Gamecocks activity logs were due this week.  Participating students will receive a ticket to the USC Women’s basketball game on Feb. 9 and the USC Men’s basketball game on Feb. 15.  They will also receive a voucher for a prize at one of the two games.  Keep it up and stay healthy!
RSM Middle:ACPSD Spelling Bee will be @ AECOM at 7 pm Mon night.  Good luck to 7th grader Kayala Brown!
The Science Fair will be held Feb. 16.  All students will complete a science project.  We are excited to see what amazing projects our students create!
RSM High:  Senior Rocky Isreal will be honored at the WJBF Football Friday Night All-CSRA Award Show in Augusta Tuesday.
The Black History program will be held Fri., Feb. 17, in the gym.  Based on last year’s program, you don’t want to miss this!
English teachers participated in the SCCTE conference at Kiawah Island last Thurs-Sat.  Mrs. Bedenbaugh, Ms. Jones, Ms. Jackson, and Mrs. Rodgers attended many different workshops and heard from several renowned speakers.  These dedicated teachers gleaned much information, learned new strategies, and gathered many new resources that will greatly benefit RSM students.  They also networked with other English teachers and professors from across SC and supported former RSM teachers Mrs. Hostetler and Ms. Hannon at their session. Our teachers even had their picture made with SC poet and teaching artist Glenis Redmond, known worldwide for her praise poetry and innovative teaching strategies.
The Renaissance Rally held last week honored the many students who made honor roll.  The Step Team also performed for the student body, and students from each class competed in a type of musical chairs game.  The winner was junior Summer CherryDalton Cockrell was also honored for his creation of a logo for the new school theme concerning farm to table/health science/agriculture/business.  Later that day, honor roll students enjoyed ice cream with the principal as a reward for their hard work.

  From David Marshall James:    Everything old is new again, times four:
    First, Broadway’s “Hamilton” continues to grow on me, particularly via a PBS special on its conception.  Before that, there was an NBC “Nightly News” presentation on a special performance of “Hamilton” for junior-high-school students, most of them inner-city, difficult-to-reach youths.  All of them glowed with superlatives following the show.
     If “Hamilton” can turn them, and others, on to American history and to the theater, I couldn’t cheer louder.  The show’s largely hip-hop score may seem unorthodox, but rhyme is the ultimate mnemonic device, dating back to the epics of Homer and Virgil, when their poetry was transmitted orally.  One whiff of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow’s “Listen, my children, and you shall hear / Of the midnight ride of Paul Revere,” and that bit of history is going to lodge in your brain.  And it isn’t just the rhyme, it’s the beat (the meter and its stresses).  Just as with hip-hop.
     I learned to sing—yes, sing—The Preamble to The Constitution via “School House Rock.”  I wonder how many of our presidential candidates could recite the Preamble.  Thank you, “School House Rock,” and thank you, Lin-Manuel Miranda, creator and star of “Hamilton.” 
    Second,  upcoming Broadway:  This March, Bette Midler joins an impressive group of leading ladies who have portrayed Dolly Gallagher Levi in Jerry Herman’s “Hello, Dolly!” on the Great White Way since its 1964 opening, from Carol Channing to Ginger Rogers to Betty Grable to Ethel Merman, for whom Herman wrote the music and lyrics.  Nevertheless, Merman turned down Herman, as she was hoping to land a TV series off of which she could retire.  The Merm guest-starred on every variety show imaginable, and on quiz shows such as “Match Game,” but the series eluded her.
     The first day of ticket sales for the 2017 premier of the “Hello, Dolly!” revival netted $9 million, so it looks as if “Miss M” has found her retirement account.  David Hyde Pierce, of “Frasier” TV fame, will be portraying “that well-known half-a-millionaire,” Yonkers, New York, merchant Horace Vandergelder.
    For those who cannot score a ticket, there’s always 20th Century-Fox’s wildly overproduced 1968 film version starring a too-young-for-the-part Barbra Streisand, who does sing the heck out of every song and looks swell in the period costumes.  Besides which, I’m a fan of overproduced musicals.  No one’s making them anymore, although “La La Land” is offering a smidge of promise.
     La Streisand has been holding  the rights to Herman’s other big Broadway musical, “Mame,” for decades, with a view toward a TV production.  The 1974 Warner Bros. film version with Lucille Ball was unjustly slammed by the critics—as was Streisand’s “Hello, Dolly!”—but I hold firm that Lucy made the perfect “Mame,” madcap and glamorous.  She, too, looks great in all her glad rags and colorful wigs.  After all, Lucy started off as a Hattie Carnegie model.
    Indeed, who could portray Mame Dennis Burnside today?  Kristin Chenoweth, maybe?  She’s got the pipes, the comedic talent, and the glamour, which lead us to:
    Third, Chenoweth as Velma Von Tussle in the recent live TV production of the 2002 Broadway musical “Hairspray,” which was base on the 1988 movie of the same title, starring Ricki Lake, Jerry Stiller, and Sonny Bono.  There’s a 2007 film version of the Broadway musical, but I think the TV production topped it, thanks in part to Chenoweth and all-around good casting, including Jennifer Hudson, Martin Short, Andrea Martin, Derek Hough, and Garrett Clayton as heartthrob Link Larkin.
     Plus-size Divine set the stage for all future Edna Turnblad’s to be portrayed by gentlemen in drag, from Harvey Fierstein onstage and in the TV special, to the dough-faced John Travolta in the movie.  Who’d have thunk that Tony Manero would one day be Edna Turnblad?  Divine delivers one of my favorite movie quotes in the original film version, to husband Jerry Stiller:  “It’s the times:  they are a-changin’.  Something’s blowin’ in the wind.  Fetch me my diet pills, will you?”  Who would have thunk that Divine was paraphrasing (except for the diet-pill bit) a future Nobel Prize for Literature winner?  That would be Bob Dylan. 
     The songs from “Hairspray” comprise a super score—my favorites are “Good Morning, Baltimore,” “I Can Hear the Bells,” “Welcome to the Sixties,” and “You Can’t Stop the Beat”—and the show made me feel like dancing, leaving a glow reminiscent of those students’ who saw “Hamilton.”
    Fourth:  Was listening to TV one recent Sunday morn, when what to my wondering ears should appear a familiar voice.  That’s … that’s Jane Pauley!  Yes, she has returned to TV as host of “CBS Sunday Morning.”  Back when I was a junior in high school, Pauley was a co-host of the “Today” show, along with Tom Brokaw.  There was quite the scandal seven years later, when Pauley was pushed aside by “Today” news reader and “younger model” Deborah Norville, prompting “All About Eve” references, including a sketch on “Saturday Night Live.”  Norville later moved on to “Inside Edition,” where she has remained for years.
    Maybe it’s difficult to describe how young Pauley’s re-emergence makes me feel:  A teensy bit like being back in high school.  Like co-opting a Jerry Herman lyric:  “Well, well, hello, Jane! / Hello, Jane! / It’s so good to have you back where you belong!”  I’m so happy I could even sing The Preamble to The Constitution.
REMINDERS
Ridge Spring Library hours: Mon/Tues 8:30 am - 12 pm; Wed., 8:30 – 4:30; Thurs 8:30 am - 12:30 pm; Fri 8:30 pm -4:30 pm
Ridge Spring Post Office hours:  Mon-Fri. 7:30 am – 11:30 am; Sat 9 – 10 am
Saluda County Library Hours:  Mon/Wed 8:30 am-5 pm; Tues/Thurs 8:30 am – 6 pm; Fri 8:30 am – 5 pm; Sat closed
Recycling Center Hours: Mon/Wed/Fri 1-7; Sat 7-7; Sun 3-7; Tues/Thurs closed
First Thursday of the Month:  AARS meets at 6:30, 685-5783

Third Thursday of the Month: FORS at Library at 5:00

Monday, January 23, 2017

January 23, 2017
Ridge Spring News
Harriet Householder

The Nut House & Country Market invites you to help celebrate Mr. Joe Cal Watson's retirement from the pecan business on Saturday, January 28th from 1-3 pm at the Nut House on Main Street in Ridge Spring. Stop by and enjoy some refreshments and give Mr. Joe Cal your best wishes!

Off the Beaten Path is excited to welcome 3 new artists to the store. New merchandise includes industrial furniture and accent pieces, personal items like shawls, scarves, and jewelry to homemade wooden signs. Hurry in to purchase a special personal gift for your special Valentine!! Cute valentine outfits for children too. Sizes limited! Open Monday & Tuesday 11-3 and Thursday-Saturday 10-5

The Gables Inn and Gardens in Ward is preparing for a Winter Retreat for scrapbookers this weekend. Looking forward to meeting new friends!  We also have Romance packages especially for the month of February. Call us about booking your special getaway night or weekend! 685-0099

The Art Association of Ridge Spring (AARS) will have a quilting Class Thursday, January 26th from 6:30-9:00 PM.  Ann Watkins will teach a quilting class with quilting frame for practice. All supplies provided for $50.00.  Call (864)941-0022 to register.
Edgefield Camellia Club: Camellia Lovers, There will be NO camellia tea at Magnolia Dale, Edgefield, SC this year.   Thank you for your past support.  We do look forward to seeing you next year at the tea.

The next Harvest Festival meeting will be on February 7 at 7:00 pm at the Ridge Spring Library.  Please feel free to attend the meeting and lend us a hand in planning for next year!

The Ridge Spring Farmers' Market will be getting a sign from the SC Association of Farmers Markets.  It will be 24” x 36” metal sign that says – “Shop Local, Buy South Carolina”. We will just need to find a place to install the sign so it will be visible….

Josie Rodgers: My Granny is breaking out of the hospital!  After 12 days receiving wonderful care at Fairfield Memorial, she is heading home to be reunited with her beloved cat Happy and to sleep in her own bed.  Our family is so thankful for the care she has received and that she is getting better and stronger each day.  We are also thankful for her dear friends who love and take care of her when we are unable to be there.  Who says senior citizens don’t have fun?  These ladies are a hoot when they are together!  God is good!
RSM Middle: The Science Fair will be held Feb. 16.  All students will complete a science project.  We are excited to see what amazing projects our students create!
RSM High:  The lovely aroma of coffee fills the halls of RSM High now that our Coffee Bean CafĂ© is up and running!  Each morning, a crowd of students and staff anxiously await their dose of coffee or cappuccino and snacks.  Smiles seem brighter and eyes more awake!
On Tues., Jan. 24, the school will hold a Renaissance Rally and celebrate all students on honor roll as well as other accolades.  Then at 12:15, these students will enjoy Trojan Island, a lunch that honors their accomplishments.  Yummy!

St. William Catholic Church Youth will be collecting stuffed animals through the end of February to donate to local organizations that assist children during troubling times.  The youth also have plans for a chili cook-off in March, the annual egg hunt in April, a Mothers’ Day dinner in May, graduation Sunday in May, Youth Sunday in June, a Fathers’ Day dinner in June, and VBS the last week of June.

This is part three and final chapter of the story of Pretty Boy the Butterfly by Rona Jay of Monetta. 
Part lll
Lisa, the young lady that wrote the article in the Augusta Chronicle, came back to visit us again and wanted to watch Pretty Boy.
I would talk to Pretty Boy off and on all day long.  He liked to get a lot of attention.  We gave it to him too.  I always would tell him how much I loved him,  He would squeeze my finger.  There are so many things that Pretty Boy could do that I am probably leaving out of this writing or that you would not believe.
He did enjoy playing on the adding machine with me, also he would stay on my hand or shoulder when I had to use the computer. He also liked staying on the counter and watching the customers.  
Pretty Boy was beginning to get some age on him as his wings were getting lighter in color and he couldn't fly as far as he had been.  His wings were thin but he still would play with us.  I began to take care of him like I would an older person.  He would hold his foot up to go around with me while I worked . At night I would feed him and he would hold his feet out for  me to wash them one by one.  When it was time for me to close up I would talk to him,  then fix him on his bed with his feet hanging on the side. 
Pretty Boy had been with us for 2 months and 4 days. The last night we were getting ready to leave after putting Pretty Boy to bed, he jumped down off of his bed and got in the middle of my desk.  I told Jimmy something was wrong as he did not want us to leave.  So we turned on the lights and I gave him a little more food and put him back in bed.  Again when we started to leave he jumped down onto my desk.  This went on for a while so we just stayed with him until he was ready to stay in bed.  So we watched to be sure he was set for the night then cut the lights out and left.
The next morning when I arrived at work before I even cut the lights on, I saw Pretty Boy in the middle of my desk with his legs down pulled behind him and he was  not moving.  I was afraid he had died.  I called his name and he pulled up his feet and started for my hand.  I turned my palm out for him to crawl up and he looked at me.  I could feel the pressure of his feet on my hand. Then his wings started to fan very, very fast and I knew he wanted to die in my hand.  He had waited on me. I feel so blessed to have had this time with Pretty Boy.
REMINDERS
Ridge Spring Library hours: Mon/Tues 8:30 am - 12 pm; Wed., 8:30 – 4:30; Thurs 8:30 am - 12:30 pm; Fri 8:30 pm -4:30 pm
Ridge Spring Post Office hours:  Mon-Fri. 7:30 am – 11:30 am; Sat 9 – 10 am
Saluda County Library Hours:  Mon/Wed 8:30 am-5 pm; Tues/Thurs 8:30 am – 6 pm; Fri 8:30 am – 5 pm; Sat closed
Recycling Center Hours: Mon/Wed/Fri 1-7; Sat 7-7; Sun 3-7; Tues/Thurs closed
First Thursday of the Month:  AARS meets at 6:30, 685-5783

Third Thursday of the Month: FORS at Library at 5:00